Art is the only thing keeping us human nowadays.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
soudasouda:

thecoolhunter_: Many of the trends we are seeing – and liking - in retail, hospitality, services and even urban planning, deal with smaller size because a strong, growing segment of us is tired of Big.
We want small, independent, pop-up, mobile, local, rogue. But – and this is an important but – we want it served up to us in a professional manner, we do not want amateur fumbling even from the smallest providers. In essence, we want what we cannot have from the mega-malls, big boxes, airports, big brands or grocery giants. And that leads to another important ‘but’. We want small BUT we still want the big, too. Nothing new here, but it still seems that many brands, marketers and researchers have a hard time dealing with the fact that we are not black-and-white, either-or. We are both-and, plus a little extra.
You cannot divide consumer habits into age categories or behaviours the way you could a decade or two ago. We are indeed picking and choosing from each basket, and we will continue to do so, but we are choosing small significantly more often than we used to. Read more on thecoolhunter.net “Small is the new Big” pic is from Happy Bones Cafe in NY posted by SoudaSouda

soudasouda:

thecoolhunter_: Many of the trends we are seeing – and liking - in retail, hospitality, services and even urban planning, deal with smaller size because a strong, growing segment of us is tired of Big.

We want small, independent, pop-up, mobile, local, rogue. But – and this is an important but – we want it served up to us in a professional manner, we do not want amateur fumbling even from the smallest providers. In essence, we want what we cannot have from the mega-malls, big boxes, airports, big brands or grocery giants. And that leads to another important ‘but’. We want small BUT we still want the big, too. Nothing new here, but it still seems that many brands, marketers and researchers have a hard time dealing with the fact that we are not black-and-white, either-or. We are both-and, plus a little extra.

You cannot divide consumer habits into age categories or behaviours the way you could a decade or two ago. We are indeed picking and choosing from each basket, and we will continue to do so, but we are choosing small significantly more often than we used to.
Read more on thecoolhunter.net “Small is the new Big” pic is from Happy Bones Cafe in NY posted by SoudaSouda

experimentsinmotion:

Ecological Minimalism: Shigeru Ban’s Paper Architecture

Winner of this year’s Pritzker Prize, the most prestigious award in modernist architecture, Japanese architect Shigeru Ban has forged a career based on his revolutionary yet restrained use of humble materials. Ban is perhaps most famous for his innovative work with paper, particularly recycled cardboard tubes. He has noted that he is attracted to paper because it is cheap, recyclable, low-tech, replaceable, and produces very little waste. Indeed, his DIY refugee shelters (used in Japan after the Kobe earthquake, in Turkey, Rwanda and around the world) composed of recycled cardboard tubes are very popular and effective for low-cost disaster relief-housing. Even the structures Ban has designed for prestigious cultural and institutional clients are built with low-cost, sustainable materials and are often meant to be recycled. Ban’s Japanese pavilion building at Expo 2000 in Hannover, Germany, a 72-metre-long gridshell made with paper tubes, for example, was ultimately recycled and returned to paper pulp. His structures do not announce themselves with the typical hallmarks of sustainability; rather, they seem to quietly embody it. This design approach, which dignifies and normalizes ecological mindfulness, appears especially innovative at a time when environmental issues are still “othered.”